Freezing Cooked and
Prepared Foods

BY FRANCES 0. VAN DUYNE

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE

CIRCULAR 835


Contents

COMBINATION DISHES
General Directions
Recipes COOKED MEAT AND VEGETABLES
BAKED FOODS
General Directions
Appetizers Angel-Food and Sponge Cakes Fruit Cake
Plain and Chocolate Cakes and Frostings Cookies Pies Quick Breads Yeast Breads Recommended Storage Times in Months

This 1984 revision has been prepared by Dr. Mary A. Keith, Extension Specialist, Foods, and Dr. Frances 0. Van Duyne, Professor Emeritus of Foods, Foods and Nutrition. The original circular was prepared by Prof. Van Duyne, Royene F. Owen, Jean T. Chase, and Barbara H. McGrath



The information given in this publication is for educational purposes only. Reference to commercial products or trade names does not constitute an endorsement by the University of Illinois and does not imply discrimination against other similar products. The reader is urged to exercise the usual caution in making purchases or evaluating product information.


FREEZING cooked or partly prepared foods has several advantages. Many homemakers realize the convenience of having available in the freezer combination dishes, baked products, and batters and doughs, which after only a little more work are ready to serve. These foods greatly simplify the problem of preparing an appetizing meal when time is short, when guests arrive unexpectedly, or when skilled hands are not available.

Freezing is a good way to preserve some surplus materials for future use. When poultry and eggs are plentiful, chicken A la king, egg whites, and angel food cakes can be added to the reserve in the home freezer or the freezer locker. When a supply of meat is being put in the freezer, some of the meat best used in stews can be so prepared and frozen. Economical use of time can also result from freezing certain combination dishes and baked products. If a recipe involves lengthy preparation and the amounts prepared can be increased without decreasing quality, time may be saved by freezing a portion and serving the rest.

Freezing large quantities of prepared or cooked foods in the home is not, however, recommended. Freezer storage space is too limited and valuable to use in this way, and freshly prepared products are usually superior to those which have been frozen.

Successful freezing of cooked or partly prepared foods depends on knowing what to freeze and how to proceed through preparation for freezing and storage to serving. Though certain precautions must be observed, preparing cooked or baked foods for freezer storage is not difficult, as will be noted from the directions given here. These directions are based on work done in the foods research laboratory at the University of Illinois in an effort to find foods suitable for freezing and methods best for each. Standard recipes were used and the products were stored in a home freezing unit for several months, thawed in various ways, and then rated for appearance, color, texture, and flavor. If these directions are followed carefully, products of high quality will be obtained. Undoubtedly other foods can be frozen satisfactorily and other recipes will give good results.

Combination Dishes

GENERAL DIRECTIONS

Ingredients and cooking time. In all recipes t = teaspoon and Tb = tablespoon. All measurements are level. Use only ingredients of the best quality. Prepare foods in the usual ways but shorten the cooking time for most of them. Cook meat and vegetables until barely tender and take from the heat at once. The tissues will soften further during the cooling, freezing, and reheating.

If completely cooked before they are frozen, meat and vegetables may be too soft when served. Long cooking also causes unnecessary losses of flavor and aroma.

Do not include potatoes or some types of rice. Potatoes are not satisfactory in combination dishes which are to be frozen - the texture is poor after freezer storage and reheating. It is better to cook and add them when the frozen food is prepared for serving.

In certain combination dishes quick-cooking rice and regular rice tend to be mushy when they are reheated after being frozen. Converted rice has been found to retain its shape and texture better.

Cool cooked foods quickly. After a food is cooked, cool it quickly to room temperature. Place the cooking pan in a larger pan of ice water or cold running water and stir occasionally. If the food is in a heavy kettle, you can cool it more quickly by transferring it to one of lighter weight.

Cleanliness is very important. Since freezing does not kill all microorganisms, strive to keep the number in the food as low as possible during preparation. Use clean utensils and sanitary methods of handling the food. Keep the food covered during cooking, and loosely covered during cooling. Package the product as soon as it reaches room temperature and freeze immediately.

Package carefully. Several types of containers are suitable for combination dishes. However, the longer the product is to be held in freezer storage the more moisture- and vapor-proof the package must be. Cylindrical cartons with slip-on lids and tub-type containers are easy to fill but they may not be air-tight. Rectangular cartons with plastic or plastic laminated foil bags which can be tightly sealed with paper-covered wire closures, rubber bands, or heat are more moisture and vapor-proof. Glass jars designed as containers for freezing, tin cans, or plastic containers with tight-fitting lids afford good protection against moisture loss and are easy to use. Freezer-to-table cookware can be overwrapped with plastic or aluminum foil for a tight seal.

Some of the heavier plastic wraps now available are suitable for freezer storage. Those made of polyvinylidene chloride (such as Saran Wrap) have been rated as excellent and are suitable for long-term storage. Those made of polyethylene (such as Glad and Handi-Wrap) are suitable for short-term storage. Those made of polyvinyl chloride (such as Reynolds Plastic) are poor choices because they are not moisture- and vapor-proof. Plastic-coated paper freezer wrap is suitable for solid foods. (For more details, see Consumer Reports, March 1983.)

For food that is packed solid be sure to leave space at the top of the container for the contents to expand during freezing. Leave 1/2 inch for a pint container, 1 inch for a quart.

Freeze immediately. Put packaged foods in the home freezing unit without delay. The temperature in the home freezing unit should be 0 degrees F. or lower.

Do not store too long. The shorter the period of freezer storage, the more appetizing these foods will be. (See the table of recommended storage times) While some foods usually do maintain quality longer than is indicated, undesirable changes may take place during freezer storage. Some fats tend to become rancid rather quickly. Separation may occur in sauces and gravies. Onion and black pepper become stronger and salt loses flavor.

With all foods there is a gradual loss of flavor, aroma, and natural texture. Be sure to write the date of preparation on every package and make a record of the packages you put in the freezer so you will not leave them there too long.

Prepare for serving. To reheat frozen cooked food, use the method which will affect its appearance and texture the least. A double boiler is best for combination dishes. A saucepan can be used if the food is partly defrosted and then heated carefully. With either method do not stir food more than necessary. Plastic wraps can be used in microwave reheating only with foods that are low in sugar or fat. High-fat and high-sugar foods can become hot enough to melt the plastic.

Use all defrosted and reheated foods at the current meal. Further holding and reheating is not recommended.

RECIPES

Baked beans with tomato sauce (2 pints)
  • 2 c navy beans 
  • 3 oz salt pork, sliced 
  • 4 slices onion 
  • 1-1/4 c tomato puree 
  • 1/4 c molasses 
  • 1/3 c brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 Tb vinegar
  • 1-1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t dry mustard
  • 1 c boiling water
  • Dash of cayenne pepper
Pick over beans and wash. Drain, cover with cold water, and soak overnight. In water used for soaking, simmer beans until tender.

Place a slice of salt pork in a baking dish and arrange the onion slices over it. Combine the other ingredients and mix well. Place beans in baking dish and cover with the mixed ingredients. Add more water if necessary to cover the beans. Lay slices of salt pork over top.

Cover and bake for 4 hours in a very slow oven (300 degrees F.). Add small amounts of boiling water during baking if necessary to keep the beans on top from becoming too dry.

Cool quickly to room temperature. Remove onion and salt pork (which tends to get rancid), and package beans. Freeze immediately.

To serve. Place frozen beans in the top of a double boiler and heat for about 45 minutes; or partly defrost the beans at room temperature for about 2 hours, then heat in a saucepan with a little water if necessary.

Beef or veal stew (4 pints)
  • 3 lb beef or veal stew meat 
  • 6 Tb butter or bacon drippings 
  • 2 t salt 
  • Dash of pepper 
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 10 medium carrots
  • 1/4 c chopped parsley
  • 2 c chopped celery
  • 1/4 c flour
Cut fat and connective tissue from 2-inch cubes of stew meat. Roll in flour and brown on all sides in butter or bacon drippings. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, cover with hot water, and cook in covered pan until meat is nearly tender. Add vegetables and cook until barely tender. Remove meat and vegetables and thicken the liquid, using 2 tablespoons of flour blended to a smooth paste with 1/4 cup of cold water. Cook until mixture boils, add meat and vegetables, and cool quickly to room temperature. Package and freeze immediately.

To serve. Place frozen stew in top of a double boiler, and heat for about 45 minutes. Or defrost overnight in a refrigerator or for several hours at room temperature; then heat in a saucepan containing a little butter or bacon fat. Stir only enough to prevent sticking. Pare, dice, and cook potatoes and add to the stew if desired.

Chicken a la king (3 pints)
  • 1/4 c butter 
  • 1/2 green pepper cut in strips 
  • 1/4 lb fresh mushrooms or drained contents of a 4-oz can
  • 6 Tb flour 
  • 2 c half-and-half
  • 2 c chicken broth
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/4 t pepper
  • 1/2 t onion salt
  • 3 c diced cold chicken
  • 1/2 pimento cut in strips
Melt butter in a heavy saucepan. Add green pepper and mushrooms, cover, and simmer for 5 minutes. Lift out pepper and mushrooms. Blend flour with fat, add half-and-half, broth, and seasonings. Cook until sauce thickens, stirring constantly. Add chicken, pimento, green pepper, and mushrooms and simmer about 5 minutes. Cool quickly, package, and freeze immediately.

To serve. Place frozen chicken A la king in top of a double boiler and heat for about 45 minutes. Serve immediately.

Italian rice (5 pints)
  • 1-1/2 c converted rice 
  • 1-1/3 Tb salt 
  • 3 c tomato juice 
  • 1/4 C fat 
  • 1-1/2 lb ground beef 
  • 3/4 c finely chopped onion
  • 1/4 c finely chopped green pepper
  • 2/3 c finely chopped celery
  • 3 c canned tomatoes
  • 1-1/3 Tb sugar
Add rice and salt to hot tomato juice and simmer about 30 minutes. Cook meat in a large heavy skillet containing fat. Add the chopped onion and cook until meat is brown. Add green pepper and celery and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer gently about 10 minutes. Cool quickly to room temperature, package, and freeze immediately.

To serve. Place frozen Italian rice in the top of a double boiler and heat for about 50 minutes, adding a little water if necessary.

Rice pilaf (5 pints)
  • 3/4 c butter or margarine 
  • 2-1/2 c converted rice 
  • 1/2 lb fresh mushrooms or drained contents of 2 4-oz cans 
  • 1 c chopped onion 
  • 1 c chopped celery
  • 2 13-1/2 -oz cans chicken broth
  • 1/2 t dried thyme leaves
  • 1/2 t salt
  • Dash of pepper
  • 1/2 c chopped parsley
Melt butter or margarine in a large, heavy saucepan with a tight-fitting lid. Add rice; stir just to coat rice with fat. Add mushrooms, onion, and celery and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Meanwhile, combine undiluted chicken broth, thyme, salt, and pepper and bring to a boil. Stir seasoned broth into rice mixture, bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer covered about 25 minutes. Fluff up lightly with a fork. Add parsley and toss. Cool quickly to room temperature, package, and freeze immediately.

To serve. Place frozen rice pilaf in the top of a double boiler and heat for about 50 minutes, adding a few tablespoons of water if necessary. Or defrost overnight in refrigerator, then heat in a saucepan. Serve immediately.

Shrimp creole (5 pints)

Sauce

  • 1/2 c butter or margarine 
  • 1/2 c chopped onion 
  • 24 stuffed green olives, thinly sliced 
  • 6 c tomatoes 
  • 1 c chopped green pepper
  • 1/4 c flour
  • 1/2 c water
  • 2 t salt
  • 1/2 t cayenne pepper, scant
  • 1-1/3 Tb sugar
  • 1 c chili sauce
  • Melt 1/2 cup butter in saucepan. Add onion and olives. Cover pan and cook over low heat for about 2 minutes. Stir in tomatoes and green pepper. Blend flour and water to make a smooth paste and stir into hot tomato mixture. Continue to cook until mixture thickens. Add salt, cayenne pepper, sugar, and chili sauce.

    Shrimp

    Meanwhile cook, shell, and devein fresh shrimp or cook frozen shrimp according to directions on package. Melt 1/2 cup butter over low heat. Stir in the cooked shrimp. Cook and stir over high heat for 2 minutes. Add the creole sauce, cover and simmer 5 minutes. Cool quickly, package, and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Heat shrimp creole in top of double boiler for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve over rice.

    Spanish sausage (5 pints)
    • 3 lb pork sausage
    • 2-1/2 c tomato juice or 1 No. 2 can 
    • 1/2 c finely chopped onion 
    • 1/2 c finely chopped green pepper 
    • 1/2 c finely chopped celery
    • 1/2 t salt
    • 1/8 t pepper
    • 1-1/2 t sugar
    • 2 Tb flour
    • 1/4 c water
    Shape sausage into patties and brown in a hot skillet. If sausage is very fat, pour off most of the fat after patties are brown. Add tomato juice, onion, green pepper, celery, and seasoning. Cover and simmer for I hour. Remove patties and cool. Blend flour and water and add to juice. Stir until mixture boils and thickens. Cool quickly. Place patties in packages and pour sauce over them. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Heat frozen sausage and sauce in top of a double boiler for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Or defrost overnight in refrigerator or at room temperature until sauce softens; then heat in a saucepan. Serve immediately.

    Tomato sauce and meat balls (4 pints)

    Sauce
    • 1 onion, chopped 
    • 3 Tb fat 
    • 2-1/2 c tomatoes or 1 No. 2 can 
    • 2 6-oz cans tomato paste 
    • 2 c water
      • 1 t salt
      • 1/2 t pepper
      • 1 Tb sugar
      • 1 bay leaf
    Brown onions in fat, add other ingredients, and cook slowly for 1 hour

    Meat Balls

    • 3/4 lb ground beef 
    • 1/4 lb ground pork 
    • 1 c fine dry bread crumbs 
    • 1/2 c grated Parmesan cheese 
    • 1 sprig parsley, chopped 
    • 1 clove garlic, minced
    • 1/2 c milk
    • 2 eggs, beaten
    • 1 t salt
    • 1/2 t pepper
    Combine ingredients, mix thoroughly, shape into balls, and brown in hot fat. Add meat balls to sauce, and cook slowly for 20 minutes. Cool quickly and package. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Heat according to directions for Spanish sausage. Serve with cooked spaghetti.

    Cooked Meat and Vegetables

    Freezing cooked meat, except in combination dishes where a solid pack can be prepared for freezing, is not recommended. Work carried on in the foods research laboratory of the University of Illinois as well as in other foods laboratories indicates that higher quality is obtained if uncooked rather than cooked poultry and meat are frozen. Carefully controlled experiments have shown that this is true for deep fat and oven fried chicken, braised beef round steaks, ham patties and loaves, and rib and loin pork roasts. In general, poultry and meat roasted or fried after freezing have a more attractive appearance and better flavor than that cooked before freezing.

    Precooked frozen vegetables have been rated as being inferior to freshly cooked and to blanched frozen vegetables. The few exceptions are products that can be solidly packed such as vegetable purees and mashed potatoes. In the latter case freezing is not recommended because it takes almost as long to thaw and reheat mashed potatoes for serving as it would to prepare them fresh.

    Baked Foods

    GENERAL DIRECTIONS

    Among the baked foods that can be frozen successfully are certain appetizers, breads, cakes, and pies. Freezing and freezer storage preserve the freshness of these products and having them at hand for emergencies is a convenience. The recipes included here are those which were found to give good results when they were tested in the University of Illinois laboratory. Probably many other products besides those described can be frozen satisfactorily.

    Preparing baked foods. Use standard recipes and methods for appetizers, breads, cakes and pies and select only ingredients of the best quality. Several of these products can be frozen either before or after they are baked. If frozen before they are baked, the following precautions are necessary:

    For cakes frozen in the batter state, use double-acting baking powder (SAS-phosphate) in order to assure good volume. Package batter and place in freezing unit immediately.

    For fruit pies frozen before baking, use a little more flour to thicken juice, and do not prick the top crust. Apple slices should be blanched before they are put in a pie, so they will keep their color, texture, and flavor better.

    Dough for rolls must be wrapped and frozen as soon as the rolls are shaped.

    Directions for packaging. Except for cake batter, these products can be satisfactorily wrapped for freezing in moisture- and vapor-proof plastic wrap, heavyweight aluminum foil, or plastic freezer bags. Heatscalable plastic bags are excellent. Tight seals prevent loss of moisture and flavor during storage.

    If you use aluminum foil, place product in center of sheet and fold two edges together over it. Roll or fold the seam tight against the product, taking care not to crush the product. Then press the ends of the package together and fold them close to the product.

    Pressure or cold-storage tape can also be used to seal plastic wrap or aluminum-foil packages.

    Plastic or waxed cylindrical freezer cartons with slip-on lids or glass freezer jars are suitable for packaging cake batter. The quart size holds enough batter for an 8-inch square cake and six cup cakes or for two 9-inch layers.

    Do not hold too long in freezer. As soon as baked products, batters, and doughs are packaged, place them in the home freezing unit. Do not, however, keep them in the freezer for long periods because quality is lost gradually during storage. The freezer space probably can be used to better advantage. A table of recommended storage periods is given on page 32.
    Cover pie with a cardboard plate of the same size as the underplate. Heat-seal in plastic wrap or wrap in aluminum foil and freeze immediately.
    Cakes may be wrapped and heat-sealed in plastic wrap before freezing. However, it is easier to package a frosted cake after it has been in the freezer long enough for the frosting to freeze. Place wrapped cake in a cardboard box for freezer storage.
    Quick breads may be tightly wrapped in aluminum foil. Roll or fold the seam against the product. Press the ends of the package together and fold close to the loaf.

    APPETIZERS

    Questions about the advisability of freezing canapes or tea sandwiches are frequently asked. Such products can of course be frozen and held in the freezer for about a week but the results are usually only fairly satisfactory. Freshness in appearance and flavor are apt to be lost, moisture content of bread may no longer be evenly distributed, and crackers or toast rounds tend to lose crispness. However, two appetizers which are baked after freezing can be recommended. Similar types among your favorite recipes may give equally good results.

    Cheese wafers and straws (6 dozen wafers or 5 dozen straws)
    • 4 oz sharp American cheese
    • 1-1/2 c sifted flour
    • 3/4 t Salt
    • Dash black pepper
    • Dash cayenne pepper
    • 1/2 c butter
    Grate the cheese or put it through a potato ricer. Sift the flour, salt, pepper, and cayenne pepper together. Cream butter until light and fluffy. Add flour and cheese mixture. Blend thoroughly. Mixture appears to be very dry and crumbly, but can be kneaded easily into a ball. Chill dough in refrigerator for 1 hour.

    To freeze cheese wafers before baking. Form dough into rolls I inch in diameter. Wrap in aluminum foil and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw rolls in refrigerator for 1 hour. Slice wafers 1/4 -inch thick and bake on cookie sheet in 400 degrees F. oven for 10 minutes. Serve warm or cold.

    To freeze cheese straws before baking. Roll out pastry on cookie sheet in strips 4 inches wide and 1/4 inch thick. Chill in refrigerator for 2 hours. Then cut into 4-inch squares and wrap in aluminum foil either individually or several squares in one package with waxed paper in between. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw in refrigerator for 1 hour. Cut into strips 1/4 inch wide. Bake on cookie sheet in 400 degrees F. oven for 10 minutes. Serve warm or cold.

    Deviled ham puffs (24 puffs)
    • 1/4 lb soft cream cheese
    • 1/2 t grated onion
    • 1/2 t baking powder
    • 1 egg yolk
    • 1/8 t salt
    • 24 small bread rounds
    • 2 2-1/4-oz cans devild ham
    Blend the cheese, onion, baking powder, egg yolk, and salt together. Toast the bread rounds on one side. Spread the untoasted side with deviled ham and cover each one with a mound of the cheese mixture. Place on cookie sheet and freeze. Remove from cookie sheet, package in plastic bags, and store in freezer.

    To serve. Place ham puffs on cookie sheet and thaw in refrigerator for 30 minutes. Bake in 400 degrees F. oven for about 7 minutes until puffed and slightly brown on top.

    ANGEL-FOOD AND SPONGE CAKES

    Frozen baked angel-food and sponge cakes, when defrosted, are very similar in quality to freshly baked cake. Angel-food cakes seem a little more moist after they have been frozen and thawed. However, both angel-food and sponge cakes are likely to shrink a little in freezer storage. (Angel-food cake made from frozen and defrosted batter is not as fine-grained as cake baked before it is frozen.)

    Delicious angel-food cake can be made from frozen egg whites. Often freezing the whites is more practical than freezing the cake. A pint container will hold the right amount of whites for one cake. After defrosting by holding them overnight in the refrigerator or at room temperature for about 5 hours, use them in the same way as fresh egg whites.

    Angel-food cake (1 large)
    • 1-3/4 c fresh or defrosted frozen egg whites
    • 1 c sifted cake flower
    • 1-1/2 c sifted sugar
    • 2 t cream of tarter
    • 3/4 t salt
    • 1 t vanilla

    Allow egg whites to come to room temperature. Sift flour and 1/4 of the sugar together 4 times.

    Using an electric mixer. Beat egg whites until foamy (15 seconds at high speed), add cream of tartar and salt, and beat until whites are stiff but not dry (about 3 minutes at high speed). Add vanilla. Then add remaining sugar a tablespoon at a time during 11/2 minutes of mixing at low speed. Scrape sides of bowl at end of each minute. Mix 1/2 minute longer at low speed after all sugar has been added.

    Remove bowl from mixer and fold in flour-sugar mixture by hand, using a wire whip. Sift about 2 tablespoons on surface of egg white mixture and fold in with 5 or 6 strokes. Repeat until all the flour mixture has been added.

    Mixing by hand. Beat egg whites and salt until foamy, using rotary egg beater or wire whip. Add cream of tartar and vanilla, and beat until egg whites are stiff but not dry. Fold in sugar gradually, adding about 2 tablespoons at a time.

    Sift about 2 tablespoons of flour-sugar mixture on the surface of the egg- white mixture and fold in, mixing only until the flour disappears. Repeat until all the flour mixture has been added.

    Baking and freezing. With a large spoon, transfer the batter to an ungreased 10-inch tube pan. Cut through the batter several times with a spatula to remove large air holes. Bake in a moderate oven (375 degrees F.) for 40 to 50 minutes. Invert pan and cool for an hour. Remove cake from pan, using a sharp knife to loosen it from the sides.

    Heat-seal cake in plastic wrap or wrap snugly in aluminum foil. Avoid mashing the cake or wrapping it too tightly. Place in a cardboard box and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Defrost cake in wrapper by placing on cake rack for 2 or 3 hours.

    Sponge cake (1 large)
    • 1 c sifted flour 
    • 5 egg yolks
    • 1 c sifted sugar 
    • 1-1/2 t grated lemon rind 
    • 2 Tb water
    • 1-1/2 Tb lemon juice
    • 5 egg whites
    • 1/4 t salt
    • 1/2 t cream of tartar

    Using an electric mixer. Sift flour 4 more times. To egg yolks, add 1/2 cup of sugar, lemon rind, and water. Beat until thick and light (7 minutes at high speed). Add lemon juice gradually during 3 additional minutes of beating. Add the flour all at once and stir until just blended.

    In another bowl, put egg whites and salt. Beat until foamy (1/2 minute at high speed). Add cream of tartar and beat until egg whites are stiff but not dry (1-1/2 minutes at high speed). Add rest of sugar, 2 tablespoons at a time, during 2 minutes of mixing at high speed. Scrape sides of bowl with spatula.

    Fold egg-yolk mixture into egg whites and mix at low speed for 3 minutes. Scrape sides well during mixing.

    Mixing by hand. Sift flour 4 times. Add 1/2 cup of sugar, lemon rind, and water to egg yolks, and beat with a rotary egg beater until thick and light. Add lemon juice gradually, beating well after each addition. Add flour all at once and stir until just blended.

    Beat egg whites and salt until foamy. Add cream of tartar, and beat until whites are stiff but not dry. Add rest of sugar gradually, 2 tablespoons at a time, and beat well. Fold egg-yolk mixture into whites.

    Baking and freezing. Transfer batter to an ungreased 9-inch tube pan. Cut through batter with a spatula to remove large air holes. Bake in a slow oven (325 degrees F.) for 1 hour or until done. Invert pan and cool cake for about an hour. Take from pan and heat-seal in plastic wrap or wrap in aluminum foil. Avoid mashing the cake or wrapping it too tightly. Put in a sturdy box and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Defrost cake by placing it, still wrapped, on a cake rack for 2 or 3 hours or place frozen cake in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) if packaged in aluminum foil. Thaw about 30 minutes and allow to come to room temperature before serving.

    FRUIT CAKE

    Fruit cake can be baked and frozen. After freezer storage the thawed cake will be more like a freshly baked cake than if it had been stored at room temperature.

    Fruit cake (5 5-1/2- X 3-1/4-inch loaves)
    • 1/4 lb diced candied citron 
    • 1/4 lb diced candied lemon peel 
    • 1/4 lb diced candied orange peel 
    • 1/2 lb candied cherries, halved 
    • 1/2 lb coarsely chopped nuts 
    • 1/2 lb diced candied pineapple 
    • 1/4 lb flake coconut 
    • 1/2 lb raisins 
    • 1/2 lb dates, cut in quarters 
    • 2 c sifted flour 
    • 1 t allspice
    • 1/2 t nutmeg
    • 1/2 t cloves
    • 1 t baking powder
    • 1 t salt
    • 1 c butter or margarine
    • 1/2 c sugar
    • 5 eggs, well beaten
    • 1/3 c honey
    • 1/2 c fruit juice

    Put all of the fruit in a bowl and mix in about 1/4 cup of the flour thoroughly coating the fruit. Sift remaining flour with spices, baking powder, and salt. Cream the butter and sugar. Beat in the eggs. Add the honey and blend thoroughly. Add the fruit juice alternately with the sifted dry ingredients. Add the fruit and mix well.

    Baking and freezing. Spoon batter into 5 loaf pans approximately 5-1/2-X 3-1/4-inches that have been lined with a layer of wrapping paper and two of waxed paper so that the waxed paper is next to the batter. Bake in a very slow oven (300 degrees F.) for 2-1/2 to 3 hours. Cool and wrap in waxed paper. Next day, wrap cakes in aluminum foil or plastic wrap and freeze.

    To serve. Allow to thaw in wrappings at room temperature for about 3 hours.

    PLAIN AND CHOCOLATE CAKES AND FROSTINGS

    These cakes can be frozen after they are baked or the batter can be frozen. Storing the batter has several advantages: it is easier to package, requires less freezer space, and the cake seems more moist, with a flavor more like that of a freshly mixed and baked cake. A frozen baked cake, however, requires less time to prepare for serving after it is taken from storage. In addition a baked cake can be frosted before it is frozen and stored.

    Plain cake (2 9-inch layers or an 8-inch square cake and 6 cupcakes)
    • 2-1/2 c sifted cake flour 
    • 2-1/2 t double-acting baking powder
    • 1 t salt 
    • 1-1/4 c sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 c milk
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 1/2 c shortening

    Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar three times. Beat eggs slightly, add milk and vanilla, and mix.

    Using an electric mixer. Place sifted dry ingredients, shortening, and half of the liquid mixture in the large bowl of an electric mixer. Mix for 2 minutes at medium speed, scraping flour into path of the beaters during first minute. Scrape bowl and beaters well, add rest of liquid, and mix for 2 minutes longer at the same speed.

    Mixing by hand. Place dry ingredients, shortening, and half the liquid mixture in a large mixing bowl. Beat vigorously for 300 strokes. Add rest of liquid and beat 200 strokes more.

    Freezing cake batter. Pour batter into a quart container and freeze immediately.

    Using frozen batter. Defrost batter for about 5 hours at room temperature. When the batter is just soft, transfer it to greased pans lined with waxed paper. Leave at room temperature for 10 to 20 minutes before baking.

    Bake cakes in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.); bake square cakes for about 45 minutes; bake layer cakes and cupcakes for 25 to 30 minutes. Cool cakes in pans for 10 minutes; then turn out on cake racks and finish cooling.

    Baking and freezing cake. Pour batter into greased pans lined in the bottom with waxed paper. Bake in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.); bake square cakes for about 45 minutes; bake layer cakes and cupcakes for 25 to 30 minutes. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, remove to a cake rack, and cool for about 45 minutes longer. Package in heat-sealable plastic wrap or wrap snugly in aluminum foil. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Defrost square cake in the wrapper at room temperature for about 2 hours, or place frozen cake in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) if packaged in aluminum foil. Thaw for 20 to 30 minutes.

    Chocolate cake (2 9-inch layers or an 8-inch square cake and 6 cupcakes)
    • 1-3/4 c sifted cake flour 
    • 1 t double-acting baking powder 
    • 1 t salt 
    • 1/2 t soda 
    • 1-1/2 c sugar 
    • 1/2 c shortening
    • 1 c milk
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 2 oz melted and cooled un-sweetened chocolate (or 1/2 c cocoa)

    Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, soda, and sugar (and cocoa, if used) three times.

    Using an electric mixer. Place sifted dry ingredients, shortening, and 1/3 cup of milk in the large bowl of an electric mixer. Mix for 2 minutes at medium speed, scraping flour into path of the beaters. Scrape bowl and beaters well. Add remaining 1/3 cup of milk, eggs, and vanilla (and melted and cooled chocolate, if used) and mix for 2 minutes longer at the same speed.

    Mixing by hand. Place dry ingredients, shortening, and 2/3 cup of milk in a large mixing bowl. Beat vigorously for 300 strokes. Add rest of milk, eggs, and vanilla (and melted and cooled chocolate, if used) and beat 200 strokes more.

    Freezing and using cake batter. Use directions for plain cakes.

    Baking and freezing cake. Use directions for plain cakes.

    Butter cream frosting (For a 9-inch layer cake)
    • 1/4 c hard butter or margarine 
    • 51/2 c sifted confectioner's sugar
    • 1/8 t salt
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 1/4 c milk or cream
    Cream the butter or margarine, 5 cups sugar, salt, and vanilla together with an electric mixer or by hand. Gradually beat in milk or cream. Beat in last 1/2 cup sugar.

    Chocolate butter cream frosting (For a 9-inch layer cake) Use above ingredients and method. After adding the milk or cream, add 3 I-ounce squares unsweetened chocolate, melted. Then beat in last 1/2 cup sugar. Beat in about 3 more tablespoons milk or cream until frosting is fluffy and will spread easily.

    Freezing. A frosted cake is much easier to package if it is first put in the freezer long enough for the frosting to freeze and then wrapped in plastic wrap or aluminum foil as shown in the picture on page 12. Quickly return it to the freezer.

    To serve. Loosen wrapping material so that frosting will not stick to it or unwrap cake and place in cake cover. Allow frosted cake to thaw at room temperature for about 3 hours.

    COOKIES

    Freezing baked cookies and cookie doughs makes it easy to keep a variety on hand at all times. Many types of baked cookies can probably be frozen, as well as refrigerator cookie doughs. The following recipes give good products, or you may use favorite recipes and methods to prepare cookies for the freezer.

    Brownies (16 2-inch squares)
    • 2/3 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 t double-acting baking powder
    • 1/4 t salt
    • 2 1-oz squares unsweetened chocolate
    • 1/3 c shortening
    • 1 c sugar
    • 2 eggs, well beaten
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 1/2 c walnut or pecan meats
    Sift flour, baking powder, and salt together. Melt chocolate and shortening over boiling water. Add sugar gradually to eggs, beating thoroughly. Add chocolate mixture and blend. Mix in dry ingredients, then add vanilla and nuts. Bake in a greased 8-inch square pan, or one similar in size, in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.) for 30 minutes. While still warm, cut in squares. Remove from pan and cool. Wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, with pieces of either material between the layers. Seal and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw brownies in the wrapping at room temperature.

    Chocolate chip cookies (3 dozen)
    • 1-1/2 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 t soda
    • 1/2 t Salt
    • 1/2 c shortening
    • 6 Tb granulated sugar
    • 6 Tb brown sugar
    • 1 egg
    • 1/2 t vanilla
    • 1-2 Tb hot water
    • 1 6-oz package chocolate bits
    • 1/2 c chopped walnut or pecan meats
    Sift together flour, soda, and salt. Cream shortening, add sugars gradually, and cream together until light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla and mix thoroughly. Stir in dry ingredients and few drops of hot water. Mix until well blended. Add chocolate bits and nuts. Drop from teaspoon on ungreased baking sheet 2 inches apart. Bake in a moderate oven (375 degrees F.) for 10 to 12 minutes. Place cooled cookies in plastic bag, or wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw cookies at room temperature without unwrapping.

    Filled cookies (6 dozen 3-inch)

    Dough

    • 2-1/2 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/4 t soda
    • 1/2 t Salt
    • 1/2 c shortening
    • 1 c sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • 2 Tb cream
    • 1 t vanilla
    Sift together flour, soda, and salt. Cream shortening and sugar thoroughly. Add eggs, cream, and vanilla, and beat. Mix in dry ingredients. Chill dough. Roll very thin (1/16 inch) and cut in circles or squares. Place on lightly greased baking sheet. On each piece of dough place a rounded teaspoon of cooled filling. Fold over and press edges together with floured tines of fork. Bake in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 8 to 10 minutes.

    Raisin, fig, and date filling

    • 1/2 c raisins, finely cut
    • 1/2 c figs, finely cut
    • 1/2 c dates, finely cut
    • 1/2 c sugar
    • 1/2 c water
    • 2 Tb lemon juice
    Cook slowly, stirring constantly until mixture thickens. Cool.

    Place cooled baked cookies in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw cookies at room temperature while still in wrapping.

    Peanut butter cookies (5 dozen)
    • 1-3/4 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 t soda
    • 3/4 t salt
    • 3/4 c shortening
    • 3/4 c peanut butter
    • 1/2 c granulated sugar
    • 1/2 c brown sugar
    • 1 egg
    • 1 t vanilla
    Sift flour, soda, and salt together. Cream shortening thoroughly, add peanut butter, and cream together until smooth. Add sugar gradually, creaming well. Add egg and vanilla and beat thoroughly. Stir in dry ingredients and mix well. Shape dough into 1-1/2-inch rolls.

    To freeze before baking. Wrap the roll of dough in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal tightly. Freeze immediately. Before baking, thaw slightly in a refrigerator and slice. Bake on an ungreased baking sheet in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 8 to 10 minutes.

    To freeze after baking. Chill rolls of dough in refrigerator. Slice, Bake on an ungreased baking sheet in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 7 to 8 minutes. When cool, place in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw cookies at room temperature in the wrapping.

    Refrigerator cookies (6 dozen)
    • 2-3/4 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 t soda
    • 1 t salt
    • 1 c shortening
    • 1/2 c granulated sugar
    • 1/2 c brown sugar
    • 2 eggs
    • 1-1/2 t vanilla
    Sift flour, soda, and salt together. Cream shortening, add sugars gradually, and cream thoroughly. Add eggs one at a time, beating thoroughly. Add vanilla and mix well. Stir in dry ingredients. Shape dough into rolls 2 inches in diameter.

    To freeze before baking. Wrap rolls of dough in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, seal, and freeze. Before baking, thaw slightly in a refrigerator and slice. Bake on an ungreased baking sheet in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 8 to 10 minutes.

    To freeze after baking. Chill dough until firm. Slice, and bake on an ungreased baking sheet in a moderately hot oven (400' F.) for 6 to 8 minutes. Cool and package in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw cookies at room temperature without unwrapping them.

    Variations of above recipe. A number of variations of the above basic recipe may be easily made:

    Chocolate cookies. Add 2 1-ounce squares of unsweetened chocolate. Melt, cool, and blend into shortening mixture.

    Coconut cookies. Add I cup chopped, shredded coconut.

    Date-nut cookies. Add 1/2 cup finely cut dates and 1/2 cup finely chopped nuts.

    Nut cookies. Add 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, pecans, or blanched almonds.

    Orange cookies. Add 1 tablespoon grated orange rind (mixed into shortening mixture) and 1/2 cup chopped pecans or blanched almonds.

    Pinwheel cookies. Into half the basic recipe mix 1 1-ounce square of unsweetened chocolate which has been melted and cooled. Chill dough. Roll the two parts of dough separately into rectangular sheets, 1/8 inch thick. Place the dark dough on the light, and roll like a jelly roll. Slice.

    Sugar cookies (5 dozen)
    • 1-1/4 c sifted all-purpose flour
    • 1/4 t baking powder
    • 1/4 t Salt
    • 1/2 c shortening
    • 3/4 c sugar
    • 1 egg
    • 1 Tb milk
    • 1 t vanilla or lemon flavoring
    Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt. Cream shortening, add sugar gradually, and cream until light and fluffy. Add egg and beat. Mix in milk and flavoring. Stir in dry ingredients. Chill dough.

    To freeze before baking. Form dough into rolls. Wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, seal and freeze. Slice frozen dough, place on lightly greased cookie sheet and sprinkle with sugar Bake in a hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 5 to 7 minutes.

    To freeze after baking. Roll very thin and cut into desired shapes. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar. Bake in a hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 5 to 7 minutes. Cool and package in a plastic bag or wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, seal, and freeze.

    To serve. Thaw cookies at room temperature in the wrapping.

    Lemon sugar cookies. In the above recipe, use 2 teaspoons grated lemon rind and I teaspoon lemon juice instead of vanilla.

    Nut sugar cookies. To the basic sugar cookie recipe, add I cup finely chopped pecan or walnut meats.

    PIES

    Frozen pastry, ingredients for pie fillings, and certain frozen pies make excellent products. Apple, blueberry, mincemeat, and pumpkin pies can be baked either before or after they are frozen. A pie baked after it is frozen is more like a freshly prepared and baked pie, and less time is needed to prepare it for freezing. But a pie that is baked and then frozen takes less time to prepare for serving.

    Another possibility is to freeze the chief ingredients of fillings and pieces of rolled pastry of appropriate size separately. This procedure is more economical of freezer space than freezing unbaked or baked pies and may in some instances be more practical. Cherries and sugar or pumpkin puree can be frozen satisfactorily for use in pies.

    Chiffon pies are completely prepared before freezing. Only lemon and chocolate pies have been tested but it seems probable that other chiffon pies will freeze equally well.

    Plain pastry for pie (1 9-inch double-crust pie or 2 9-inch baked pastry shells)

    Sift flour and salt together. Cut fat into flour with a pastry blender or two knives until pieces are about the size of peas. Add water by the teaspoonful, mixing lightly with a fork and tossing moistened particles to one side, When all particles are moistened, gather lightly together and shape into two balls. Wrap dough in waxed paper and chill in refrigerator. Roll half the dough on a lightly floured board or between two sheets of waxed paper, and line pie plate.

    After filling the pie, roll other half of dough. Cut slits in it if the pie is to be baked before it is frozen, but not if it is to be frozen unbaked. Place crust over filling and fit it to bottom crust. Trim off excess pastry and press crusts together lightly with fingers or tines of a fork.

    Freezing pastry. Pastry may be frozen separately and used later. One way to package rolled-out pastry is to cut a piece of cardboard of the same size as the pastry and cover it with waxed paper. Two pieces of waxed paper are put between each two pieces of pastry and several can be wrapped together. Use aluminum foil or plastic wrap for packaging or seal in a large plastic bag with as little remaining air space as possible. Pieces of frozen pastry can be removed as needed and allowed to thaw 10 to 15 minutes before using in the preparation of a pie.

    Apple pie (1 9-inch)
    • 2/3 c sugar
    • 1/4 t cinnamon
    • 1 or 2 Tb flour
    • 7 or 8 tort apples
    • 1 Tb butter
    Blend sugar, cinnamon, and flour, using 1 tablespoon of flour for a pie to be baked before freezing and 2 tablespoons for an unbaked frozen pie.

    Peel apples, cut in quarters, and core. Cut each quarter in 4 or 5 slices. If apples are to be used in unbakcd frozen pies, blanch them in steam for 3 minutes, cool in running water, drain and blot dry with towels. Arrange half of the apples in the pastry-lined pie plate and sprinkle with half the sugar-cinnamon-flour mixture. Add rest of apples, sprinkle with remainder of sugar blend, and dot with butter.

    Cover with top crust as directed.

    Pie baked before freezing. Bake in a hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 30 to 35 minutes.

    Cool pie thoroughly. Wrap as shown in the picture above.

    To serve. Remove the plastic wrap or aluminum foil. Place pie in a hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 20 to 30 minutes. Leave plate over top to prevent further browning of top crust. Cool and serve.

    Pie baked after freezing. Invert second plate (which may be cardboard) over top of pie and heat-seal in plastic wrap or wrap in aluminum foil. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Remove wrapping and top plate. Protect edge of crust with aluminum foil. Bake in a hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 60 to 70 minutes. After 10 minutes make slits in top crust. Remove aluminum foil around edge for the last 5 minutes of baking. Cool and serve.

    Blueberry pie (1 9-inch)

    Blend sugar and flour and sprinkle one-third of it on the bottom of pie. Add half the blueberries, sprinkle with one-third of the floursugar mixture. Add remaining blueberries and flour-sugar mixture. Sprinkle with lemon juice.

    Cover with top crust as directed above.

    Follow directions given above for baking before or after freezing.

    Chocolate chiffon pie (1 9-inch)
    • 2 1-oz squares unsweetened chocolate, grated 
    • 1/2 c boiling water 
    • 1 Tb (1 envelope) unflavored gelatin 
    • 1/4 c cold water
    • 4 egg yolks
    • 1 c sugar
    • 1/4 t Salt
    • 1 t vanilla
    • 4 stiffly beaten egg whites
    • 1 9-inch baked pastry shell
    Melt chocolate in boiling water. Soften gelatin in cold water, add to chocolate, and stir until gelatin dissolves. Add egg yolks beaten light with 1/2 cup sugar. Add salt and vanilla. Cool. Beat remaining 1/2 cup sugar into egg whites. Fold into chocolate mixture. Pour into cooled baked shell. (To prepare baked pie shell, prepare half the recipe for plain pastry. Bake shell in a hot oven [425 degrees F.] for 15 minutes.) Wrap the pie for freezing immediately, as shown in the picture.

    To serve. Without removing the wrapping, thaw pie for approximately 30 minutes at room temperature. Do not reheat. If desired, a topping of whipped cream may be added after the pie is thawed.

    Lemon chiffon pie (1 9-inch)
    • 4 beaten egg yolks
    • 1 c sugar
    • 1/2 c lemon juice
    • 1/2 t salt 
    • 1 Tb (1 envelope) unflavored gelatin
    • 1/4 c cold water
    • 1 t grated lemon peel
    • 4 stiffly beaten egg whites
    • 1 9-inch baked pastry shell
    Combine egg yolks, 1/2 cup sugar, lemon juice, and salt; cook in a double boiler until mixture thickens, beating constantly with a rotary beater. Add gelatin softened in cold water, stir until gelatin dissolves. Add lemon peel and cool until partially set. Beat remaining 1/2 cup sugar into egg whites and fold in cooled mixture. Pour into cooled baked shell. (To prepare baked pie shell, prepare half the recipe for plain pastry. Bake shell in a hot oven [425 degrees F.] for 15 minutes.) Wrap the pie for freezing immediately.

    To serve. Without removing the wrapping, thaw pie for approximately 30 minutes at room temperature. Do not reheat. If desired, a topping of whipped cream may be added after the pie is thawed.

    Mincemeat pie (4 9-inch)
    • 1 lb lean beef 
    • 1/2 lb suet 
    • 2 lb tart apples 
    • 1-1/2 lb raisins 
    • 1/2 lb currants 
    • 1/2 c diced, candied orange peel 
    • 1/8 lb citron, chopped 
    • 1-1/2 t Salt
    • 1-1/2 t Cinnamon 
    • 1/2 t allspice 
    • 1/2 t cloves 
    • 1 c granulated sugar 
    • 1 c brown sugar, firmly packed 
    • 1/2 c molasses
    • 1-1/2 Tb lemon juice 
    • 1 c cider
    Cut meat in small pieces. Add 1-1/2 cups water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 2 or 3 hours or until tender. Remove meat, measure stock and add enough water to make 1-1/4 cups. Put suet through grinder. Chop apples in small pieces. Put meat, stock, suet, and apples in a large kettle. Add rest of ingredients except lemon juice and cider. Simmer about I hour, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Add lemon juice and cider during last 5 minutes of cooking.

    Pie baked before freezing. Put 2-1/2 cups hot mincemeat into 9-inch pie pans lined with pastry. Cover with top crust as directed in pastry recipe. Bake in a 425 degrees F. oven for 30 minutes or until crust is golden brown. Cool thoroughly. Package and freeze.

    To serve. Remove the wrapping. Place pie in a 425 degrees F. oven for 30 minutes to thaw. Leave plate over the top crust to prevent further browning.

    Pie baked after freezing. Put 21/2 cups mincemeat (cooled to room temperature) into pie shells. Cover with top crust. Do not cut slits. Wrap and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Remove wrapping and top plate. Place pie in hot oven (425 degrees F.) for 40 minutes. After 10 minutes cut slits in top crust with a knife.

    Pumpkin Pie (1 9-inch)
    • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
    • 1 No. 303 can or 2 c pumpkin
    • 3/4 c brown sugar
    • 1/2 t salt
    • 1 t cinnamon
    • 1/2 t nutmeg
    • 1/2 t ginger
    • 1 c evaporated milk
    Mix ingredients in order given. Pour into an unbaked 9-inch pastry shell.

    Pie baked before freezing. Bake in a hot oven (450 degrees F.) for 15 minutes. Then reduce temperature to 350 degrees F. and bake 40 minutes. Cool pie thoroughly and wrap as before.

    To serve. Unwrap the pie and thaw 50 minutes at 300 degrees F. with paper plate over the top of the pie.

    Pie baked after freezing. Package as before and freeze.

    To serve. Remove wrapping and place in hot oven (450 degrees F.) for 20 minutes. Bake 60 minutes longer at 350 degrees F.

    QUICK BREADS

    A few kinds of quick breads have been baked and frozen with satisfactory results. Probably others will freeze equally wen. One advantage of freezing quick breads is to have several kinds available at one time without spending many consecutive hours in their preparation.

    Boston brown bread (2 9-X 5-inch loaves)
    • 1-1/2 c flour
    • 1-1/2 t Soft
    • 2-1/2 t soda
    • 1/4 c sugar
    • 2 c whole wheat flour
    • 1/3 c shortening
    • 1 c raisins
    • 1 egg, well beaten
    • 2 c sour milk or buttermilk
    • 3/4 c molasses
    Sift flour, salt, soda, and sugar together into a large bowl. Add whole wheat flour and mix well. Cut in the shortening until mixture resembles coarse meal. Mix in the raisins. Combine the egg, milk, and molasses. Stir the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients only until all the flour is dampened. Bake in 2 greased pans, 9 x 5 inches, in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.) for 45 to 50 minutes or until done. Cool bread in pans about 10 minutes, turn out on rack and cool about 1 hour. Package in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and seal as shown in the picture on page 12. Freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw bread in wrapping at room temperature for about 2 hours.

    Nut bread (2 7- 3/8 - X 3-3/8 -inch loaves)
    • 3 c sifted flour
    • 1 c sugar
    • 3 t baking powder
    • 1 t salt
    • 1 c chopped nuts
    • 1 egg, slightly beaten
    • 1-1/2 c milk
    • 2 Tb melted shortening
    Sift flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt together. Stir in the chopped nuts. Combine the egg, milk, and shortening and add to the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly.

    Put batter into two greased loaf pans, 7-3/8 X 3-5/8 inches. Push batter high into each comer. Let stand 20 minutes. Bake in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.) for 45 to 50 minutes. Cool bread in pan 10 minutes and on a rack about 1 hour. Wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, seal, and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Without removing the wrapping, thaw at room temperature for about 2 hours.

    Orange bread (2 7 3/8 - X 3 5/8 -inch loaves)
    • 2 c sifted flour
    • 1/2 t Salt
    • 1 t baking powder
    • 1 t soda
    • 1 large orange
    • 1 c raisins 
    • 1/2 c nuts 
    • 2 Tb shortening 
    • 1 c sugar 
    • 1 egg
    Sift flour, salt, baking powder, and soda together. Put juice of orange into 1 cup measure and fill to 1 cup level with boiling water. Grind the orange rind, raisins, and nuts. Cream shortening and sugar together. Add the egg and the ground mixture. Add sifted dry ingredients alternately with the juice mixture. Stir only until blended.

    Bake in two 7-3/8 X 3-5/8-inch greased loaf pans in a moderate oven (350 degrees F.) for 50 to 60 minutes. Cool bread in pans about 10 minutes, then turn out on a rack to cool for about I hour. Wrap in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, seal, and freeze immediately.

    To serve. Thaw bread in wrapping at room temperature for about 2 hours.

    YEAST BREADS

    Bread and rolls that are frozen and held in freezer storage do not stale at the usual rate. Yeast rolls may be frozen after baking, or the dough may be frozen. The former method of preparation is preferred because it is more convenient and because the quality of the rolls is higher. The volume, texture, and flavor of the baked rolls are maintained for several months of freezer storage. Frozen dough should be thawed and baked within one week after it is frozen. Swedish tea ring, baked before freezing, was rated good after freezer storage. Other baked products made with sweet roll dough will probably be found to be suitable for freezing.

    Yeast rolls (3-1/2 to 4 dozen)
    • 1-1/2 c milk, scalded 
    • 6 Tb melted shortening 
    • 6 Tb sugar 
    • 1 Tb salt 
    • 2 packages dry yeast(or 2 cakes compressed yeast)
    • 1/2 c warm or lukewarm water
    • 2 eggs
    • 7 c sifted all-purpose flour (about)
    Scald milk and pour into a large mixing bowl. Add melted shortening (not hot), sugar, and salt. Cool until lukewarm (100 degrees F.). Sprinkle dry yeast into warm water and let stand 10 to 15 minutes (or crumble compressed yeast, add lukewarm water, and stir well). Add the blended yeast to the lukewarm milk mixture. Add eggs and 2 cups sifted flour. Beat until the mixture is smooth. Gradually add the remaining flour, working it in well. Turn dough out on a lightly floured board and knead about 10 minutes until smooth and satiny. Place in a lightly greased bowl and brush with melted shortening. Cover and allow to rise in a warm place (82 degrees to 86 degrees F.) free from drafts, until doubled in bulk (1-1/2 to 2 hours). Then punch down, shape as desired, and place in a greased pan.

    Rolls baked before freezing. Allow shaped rolls to rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk (about 1 hour). Bake in a moderately hot oven (400' F.) for 15 to 20 minutes. Cool on cake racks and package in aluminum foil or plastic wrap. Seal the packages and freeze at once.

    To serve. Place frozen rolls in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) if packaged in aluminum foil, and in a very slow oven (300 degrees F.) if packaged in plastic wrap. Thaw and heat the rolls in their original wrappings for 20 minutes.

    Rolls frozen in dough stage. Immediately after dough has been shaped into rolls and placed in pans, wrap the pans in aluminum foil or plastic wrap (or place the shaped dough in paper baking cups and package in moisture-vapor-proof containers). Seal and freeze at once.

    To serve. Remove wrapping. Allow the shaped dough to thaw and rise in baking pans in a warm place until light (2 to 2-1/2 hours). Bake in a moderately hot oven (400 degrees F.) for 15 to 20 minutes.

    Swedish tea ring (2 rings)

    Sweet roll dough

    • 1/2 c milk 
    • 1/2 c sugar 
    • 1-1/2 t Salt
    • 1/4 c shortening 
    • 1/2 c warm orlukewarm water
    • 2 packages dry yeast (or 2 cakes compressed yeast)
    • 2 eggs
    • 4-1/2 c sifted all-purpose flour (about)

    Filling

    • 1/4 c melted butter
    • 1 c brown sugar 
    • 3 t cinnamon
    • 1/2 c coarsely chopped pecans
    • 1/2 c raisins
    • 12 maraschino cherries, halved

    Glaze

    • 1 c sifted powdered sugar
    • 2 Tb milk
    • 1/4 t salt
    • 1/4 t vanilla
    Scald milk and add sugar, salt and shortening. Cool until lukewarm (100 degrees F.). Sprinkle dry yeast into warm water in a bowl and let stand 10 to 15 minutes (or crumble compressed yeast, add lukewarm water, and stir well). Stir in lukewarm milk mixture. Add eggs and 3 cups flour. Beat until smooth. Gradually add the remaining flour. Last cup of flour may be kneaded in. Turn out on lightly floured board and knead until smooth and satiny. Place in a lightly greased bowl and brush with melted shortening. Cover and let rise in a warm place (82 degrees to 86 degrees F.) free from drafts until doubled in bulk (1-1/2 to 2 hours).

    Punch down sweet roll dough and divide in half. Roll each half into a rectangle 9 X 13 inches. Brush each rectangle with 2 tablespoons of the melted butter. Mix brown sugar, cinnamon, pecans, and raisins together and sprinkle half of mixture over each rectangle. Roll up like jelly roll beginning with largest side. Seal edge and place cut side down on greased cookie sheet. Seal ends together to make a circle. With sharp knife or scissors cut slits1 inch apart and about 1/2 inch from center of circle. Turn each slice so that it lies flat on pan with cut side up forming a ring. Decorate with halved maraschino cherries. Cover, let rise until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour. Bake in a moderately hot oven (375 degrees F.) for 10 to 15 minutes.

    Mix powdered sugar, milk, salt, and vanilla together. Glaze each tea ring while still warm with half the mixture. Cool on cake racks and package in aluminum foil. Seal the packages and freeze at once.

     To serve. Thaw in wrapping in a very slow oven (300 degrees F.) for about 30 minutes.


    RECOMMENDED STORAGE TIMES IN MONTHS


    • Appetizers
      • Cheese wafers and straws-2 
      • Deviled ham puffs-1 
    • Baked products 
      • Cakes 
        • Angel food - baked-4 
        • Chocolate 
          • Baked-3 
          • Batter-2 
        • Frosted-3 
        • Fruit-baked-4 
        • Plain 
          • Baked-3 
          • Batter-2 
        • Sponge - baked-4 
      • Cookies 
        • Brownies - baked-4 
        • Chocolate chip -baked-4 
        • Filled - baked-4 
        • Peanut butter 
          • Baked-6 
          • Dough-4 
        • Refrigerator 
          • Baked-6 
          • Dough-6 
        • Sugar 
          • Baked-6 
          • Dough-6 
      • Pies 
        • Apple 
          • Baked-4 
          • Unbaked-4 
      • Pies (continued) 
        • Blueberry 
          • Baked-4 
          • Unbaked-4 
        • Chocolate chiffon-2
        • Lemon chiffon-2 
        • Mincemeat 
          • Baked-2 
          • Unbaked-2 
        • Pumpkin 
          • Baked-2 
          • Unbaked-2 
      • Quick breads 
        • Boston brown - baked-4 
        • Nut - baked-2 
        • Orange - baked-4 
      • Yeast breads 
        • Rolls 
          • Baked-4 
          • Dough-1 week 
        • Swedish tea ring-2 
    • Combination dishes 
      • Baked beans with tomato sauce-4 
      • Beef or veal stew-2 
      • Chicken a la king-4 
      • Italian rice-2 
      • Rice pilaf-4 
      • Shrimp creole-4 
      • Spanish sausage-2 
      • Tomato sauce and meat balls-2

     The Illinois Cooperative Extension Service provides equal opportunities in programs and employment.


    Urbana, Illinois July, 1984
    Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension Work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, John B. Claar, Director, Cooperative Extension Service, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.
    7M-7-84-59519-sz